Buenavista is My Hometown Name, Meaning Beautiful Scenery

Town With  Beautiful Sceneries


buenavista

 

 

 

 

Camaren


Camaren and Buenavista are the same place. It’s been around for at least 150 years, as far back as the time when Spain was about to be defeated by the Americans. But don’t take my word for it. I don’t really know. Buenavista is one of those small, unknown town in the Philippines with a population of presently, 26,000 according to Philippines Census

 

Mount Buntis

This is the view in front of my house in the Philippines. Beautiful view of a mountain range with the funny name Mount Pregnant (buntis is the Tagalog word for pregnant). It seems to some that the mountain looks like a pregnant lady lying on her back.

The mountain is about 24 miles from Buenavista. It is not even 1,000 feet in height but during the time when I was still living there, you could see it clearly every time because of the clear skies, unlike the  polluted skyline of Manila which is only 99 miles from my hometown Buenavista.

Buenavista is the place where I started my personal diary. And I don’t regret having that diary. Buenavista is such a picturesque place. It was an agricultural small town where there was plenty of carabaos which were the beasts of burden which farmers could use to plow their fields, transport their crops and other work in the fields. Carabaos are called water buffaloes in other places. They were parts of my childhood and the main street of Buenavista at that time was bad and most of the time full of potholes and carabao  droppings. Carabaos are completely grass-fed so their poops don’t smell bad. The farmers even use them to build threshing floor for their grains. They are temporary floors whose principal material were carabao poops instead of cement. They harden like soft asphalt when spread evenly on the ground. Farmers now have a good place built with hardly any cost to thresh or separate the palay (rice with their husks on) from their stems. 

Jophel Botero Ybiosa, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

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